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Radicalisation and Extremism

The school PSHE programme (particularly for secondary school pupils and pupils in year 6 at primary school) should build pupils’ resilience to radicalisation by promoting fundamental British values and enabling them to challenge extremist views. It should not stop pupils debating controversial issues.  Schools should provide a safe space in which children, young people and staff can understand the risks associated with terrorism and develop the knowledge and skills to be able to challenge extremist arguments.  Pupils need to be taught to manage risk, make safer choices, and recognise when pressure from other threatens their personal safety and wellbeing.

Curriculum resources for schools:

Worries about the world This webpage from Childline is helpful to use with children if they are concerned about events reported in the media such as terrorist attacks, extremism and radicalisation.

Prevent for Schools (P4S), created by the Pan-Lancashire Prevent for Education Group, provides a variety of practical materials and broader guidance to support schools with educating and safeguarding pupils against the dangers of radicalisation and violent extremism.

Trust Me: The London Grid for Learning and ChildNet International have developed resources for primary and secondary schools addressing the development of critical thinking when looking at online materials. The lessons could be used within PSHE/Citizenship and support schools in teaching the skills necessary to recognise online extremism and propaganda.Education Against Hate
This website gives parents, teachers and school leaders practical advice on protecting children from extremism and radicalisation.

Educate Against Hate. This website gives parents, teachers and school leaders practical advice on protecting children from extremism and radicalisation.

Inclusion, belonging and addressing extremism – KS1/2 lesson pack – these four primary lesson plans focus on recognising similarities and differences, belonging to a community, and stereotyping. The pack includes a teacher guidance document and each lesson plan is accompanied by a classroom ready PowerPoint and relevant resources.

Inclusion, belonging and addressing extremism – KS4 lesson pack –  the PSHE Association have updated  their Key stage 4 lesson plans that focus directly on extremism and radicalisation. The resources promote inclusion and a sense of belonging by providing a safe environment for debating emotive issues. The lessons develop students’ ability to analyse  media and social media content, and promote empathy and respect for others.

Addressing extremism and radicalisation lesson plans – A series of four lesson plans for key stage 4 with a specific focus on addressing extremism and radicalisation of all kinds, from the PSHE Association, commissioned by Medway Public Health Directorate.

Extremists – KS4 lesson materials from TrueTube – TrueTube and the PSHE Association published lesson materials to accompany the TrueTube video clip ‘Extremists’. The video highlights how people may come to hold extremist views, and addresses the emotions and experiences connected to those views. The lesson helps young people to build resilience to extremist ideologies, manage disagreements with someone who holds opposing views, and explores the distinction between extremism and activism.

Triple V (Values Versus Violence) is a Dot Com Children’s Foundation resource for secondary schools. The VVV resources aim to empower young people by helping them to develop positive behaviours and learn how to keep themselves and their friends safe. They provide opportunities to discuss criminal behaviour and victimisation in a safe environment and, as a result, they lead to changes in behaviour. The ‘Watch Over Me’ series is a broadcast-quality “soap opera” which engages young people and helps them create their own strategies for dealing with risk. It is a classroom tool which stimulates discussion and helps pupils feel safe enough to talk about the most challenging issues which affect personal safety.

Prevent – A teaching and learning resource. This resource, from Stockton-upon-Tees, explores the difficult issue of extremism providing a framework to support teachers who are engaged in teaching about this issue.

Addressing extremism and radicalisation lesson plans   This resources consists of a series of four lesson plans for key stage 4 with a specific focus on addressing extremism and radicalisation of all kinds, from the PSHE Association, commissioned by Medway Public Health Directorate.

Visiting speakers or events

It is a requirement under the Prevent duty to have robust safeguarding policies in place – including clear protocols for ensuring that any visiting speakers are suitable and appropriately supervised in line with school vetting procedures.

Ensure visiting speakers are suitable and appropriately supervised:

  • Agree purpose for inviting a visiting speaker and guidelines on content
  • Where possible submit details of talk in advance
  • Speaker should be treated like any other visitor and appropriately supervised at all times

A risk assessment and visiting speaker protocol is provided below:

Visiting speaker protocol (Word)

Risk assessment for visiting speaker (Word)